The Wolf of Cold Call Street – 4 Ways to Improve your Cold Call with Creative Marketing

K3392_Cold_Call_Marketing_Blog_image

Some of you may have caught the film The Wolf of Wall Street (if you haven’t, well worth a watch!). It is a true story starring the charismatic Leonardo DiCaprio as Jordan Belfort, a New York stockbroker who makes his millions in fraud and corruption on the stock market.

I personally saw the film only 2 weeks ago, and there was this one particular scene that inspired me to write this subsequent blog.

SPOILERS ALERT! AVERT YOUR EYES IF YOU WANT TO SEE THE FILM!

It is the scene where Leonardo DiCaprio walks into the firm brokering penny stocks, he picks up the phone to make his first call of the day, and says the lines:

Jordan Belfort: “Hello John, how you doing today? You mailed in my company a postcard a few weeks back requesting further information on penny stocks that had huge upside potential with very little downside risk, does that ring a bell?”

John: “Oh yeah, I may have sent something in.”

Belfort then goes on to sucker John in to buying lots of shares into a dud company.

What captured me about this scene was not the sublime way in which DiCaprio can reel off an incredible sales pitch over the phone in just 60 seconds (although I do so wish I was THAT good), but the fact that the cold call started by DiCaprio asking the client about a mailer which he had been sent and acted on, which is how the lead came about.

Now just think. What if DiCaprio, or Belfort at the time, opened up that sales call to John and John did not have any idea of who Belfort was or why he was getting the call? What would have been the outcome?

Probably a very quick thanks, but no thanks and goodbye.

And that’s the point. Your cold call is only as good as the creative marketing that precedes it.

Now, that scene was played out in an era where the internet was just starting up, where digital and content marketing had not even been heard or perhaps even dreamed of, and mailing and cold calling was still the norm.

Today the sales and marketing landscape is much different. The contingent that argues for digital and content marketing is ever growing and the cold call is now treated as a dinosaur sales tactic.

In my opinion though, the cold call is just as relevant to today’s market as it was in Belfort’s time.

It is still the first port of call where you as a company can find out the client’s needs, the requirements they seek, how we can solve their problems, and how to build rapport. Nothing can replace that confidence someone can portray by speaking over the phone, or even face-to-face for that matter.

Here are 4 ways to improve your cold calling.

1. Do send out information first so the client knows who you are

Be it a mailer, brochure, leaflet, e-shot, personal email etc. it will always pay dividends to send out some information to your potential client prior to calling.

At the very least, it will make them aware of you. At the very most, if your initial marketing is up to scratch, it will engage the client and create interest.

2. Use the Call-to-Action

Always give the client a reason to contact you. Whether it is by incentive, a no obligation quote, a voucher, a tear off and return form, never forget to include a call to action on your communications materials.

Whatever incarnation your call-to-action takes, it is the driver that allows clients to take their interest further.

3. Follow up with more marketing

Following up to your initial piece of marketing with even more marketing is another good way to make sure the message has hit home.

The benefits of doing more marketing prior to the call is that if the initial information had not been seen or had been lost in transition, then it gives another chance for the information to make its way to the customer. On the other hand, if it has been seen already, then it just helps reinforces the message.

For us personally, it can be anything from a simple e-shot, to some samples or a case studies portfolio.

4. The Call

By now, your cold call shouldn’t be so much as cold, but more of a lukewarm state if your marketing has done what it has set out to achieve.

I’m not going to teach how to do a cold call here as there are many many different ways you can approach this topic, but Susan Ward has given a detailed approach here if you want a read.

I personally prefer the soft sell, the reference back to marketing materials we’ve sent before and the sell on benefits. Certainly I wouldn’t be a fan of the DiCaprio/Belfort high pressure sales tactics, but some can make it work for them, albeit in a not so ethical manner.

If you want to know more about how creative marketing can help with other areas of your business just give me a shout.

Until next time!

Ricco

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4 Key Values that Lead to Better Web Design

If you’ve been paying attention to our Twitter feed, you may have noticed we’ve been working with software development specialists Black Cat Solutions of late, and very recently we launched their new responsive website.

Now, just as much as we’ve been guiding them and their marketing strategy, they have also been giving us some useful tips from their experiences. Most notable is the process of Agile Development.

In a nutshell, agile development is a group of methodologies that enables swifter, better software development over traditional development models such as the waterfall process. It is underpinned by the following values:

Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools
Working Software over Comprehensive Documentation
Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation
Responding to Change over Following a Plan

These values are what also underpin great web design and development.

Here’s why:

1. Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools

In the modern world of digital marketing, things are constantly evolving. As such, processes and tools are always being outdated sooner than they can be written up.

Rather than limiting yourself to things that have been tried, tested and done to death, encouraging individuals and interactions between both client, agency and web developer leads to more creativity, thinking outside of the box and innovation.

Think back to Responsive Web Design, introduced by Ethan Marcotte. By ditching the processes and tools, and thinking ahead to the future of mobile-led interaction and browsing, responsive web design was born to fit the needs of the future generation.

Do not stifle creativity. You limit the possibilities of true innovation and might as well employ robots if you do.

2. Working Software over Comprehensive Documentation

Often, software developers in past times would be wrapped up in producing document after document to cover accountability and track progress. It is a long-winded and arduous task, often time consuming and in the end creates long lead times for development.

Developers will always favour working software over documentation. A lot can be found out from a work-in-progress website, even if it is half finished. Integral issues to a website’s success such as interaction, ease-of-navigation, user-experience, flow, design and engagement can often be concluded during the early stages of development.

If it doesn’t feel right from the outset, things can be changed early on. Obviously, this is not something that can be achieved through looking at documentation alone.

Do not get tied in knots perfecting one section before moving on. Your deadlines will never be met if you chase perfection.

3. Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation

In the creative marketing world, customer collaboration is key. It is your customer who will know best what their target market is, the forces in play, their competitors and the marketplace they are competing in.

The negotiation stage of building a website should come at the start of the process, where a brief is produced so that the agency can understand the overall goals and objectives of the new website.

As the client, it is then your duty to involve yourself during development to make sure the website being produced is “on brief”, and not straying away from the end goals that had been set out.

On the flip side, it should be the agency’s duty to challenge the customer, making sure the experience and creative input is what comes to the fore to make sure those end goals are being met in the best way possible.

Do not become personally attached. We often find one small opinion can vastly affect the outcome of a website. Step back and always keep in mind who the website is for and how they would react.

4. Responding to Change over Following a Plan

A final value to always keep in mind is that responding to change is part and parcel of great web design.

Confining and limiting yourself to a plan would be to ignore everything else that is happening in the digital world, and given that the digital world never stays still for very long, that is a dangerous game to play.

Responding to change will always give you the best chance to have an optimised website that best meets the needs of the end user. Where the means of interaction are changing all the time, the methods of communication will need to change along with it.

Do not plow on through a project if it will be doomed to fail. At the end of the day, you’ll waste your budget on a website that will be outdated even before its launch.

A Final Tip:

Fundamentally, a website is a tool for marketing. It is for end users to find out further information, make a purchase or enquire further. The development process, through each stage, should always have this in focus and in the end your design should be reflective of what your customer wants from your website.

Feel free to ask us on any questions about web design and development!

Ricco

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#MWL2014 – More Adventures and 3 Key Lessons Learnt

#MWL 2014

#MWL 2014

 

“Eighty percent of success is showing up” – Woody Allen

I start with a famous Woody Allen quote as last year, I showed up to Marketing Week Live (MWL) 2013. I was, quite simply, blown away. The success that has since followed for us has been amazing.

Fast forward to MWL 2014, this time with partner in crime Craig Ward, we showed up once again to live, learn and breathe marketing with the best of them.

And again, blown away.

From the Green Man of Equinox Design, to the Lead Forensics’ Whack-a-Mole type game, everybody was there to excite, innovate, and inspire us marketers and agencies to do more and be more.

This year, we were privileged enough to be witness of 3 great conferences.

1. Help! 7 content problems and how to fix them – Sticky Content

Amy Nicholson of Sticky Content

Amy Nicholson of Sticky Content

Hosted by the sharp and witty Amy Nicholson of Sticky Content, this was a great conference from an expert in the field of how to create content well, publish consistently, overcome the problems of content creation and generally just being smarter about the way you write.

Some key tips we’ve learnt include planning well in advance, being clear on the content piece function and being organised with your content, whether it’s already been published or is in the pipeline for publishing .

With every day problems such as having our content go through too many rounds of amends, deadlines being ignored, not having a focus on your content etc. it was fantastic to get real practical solutions from someone who has been there and done it all. A massive thanks to Amy and Sticky Content!

Killer tip: Create a content calendar!

2. Building great client-agency relationships – Vision Express and Dare

Andy Portsmouth of Vision Express and John Owen of Dare

Andy Portsmouth of Vision Express and John Owen of Dare

Co-hosted by Andy Portsmouth of Vision Express and John Owen of Dare, we picked up a thing or two about how to create a lasting, fulfilling partnership between clients and agencies.

As the modern client-agency relationship now lasts less than 3 years, it is with great pleasure to find a relationship such as Vision Express and Dare’s, spanning many years and successful campaigns. See their latest ‘Vision. Taken Seriously’ TV ad here.

Their secret? It stems from 3 key fundamental values of Respect, Trust and Time.

As we’ve learnt, respect comes through knowledge of your audience, company, competitors, the marketplace and the structural forces that dictate your market. Only when you as a client know that can an agency start respecting you.

Trust needs to be earned over time, and both client and agency need to know where their jobs start and finish. Put simply, the “what” and “why” should be covered by the client, i.e. what the campaign is, why the campaign works, and the “how” should be covered by the agency, i.e. the agencies should be the master storytellers.

A key tip is to always challenge each other and make each other accountable. The purpose is not to lay blame but to find out if things go wrong, where they went wrong and why they went wrong.

Killer Tip: Always give each other time to learn, even from failed campaigns!

3. Ten latest trends in website and user experience – CIM

James Cherkoff of CIM

James Cherkoff of CIM

With the digital marketing landscape changing at a rate of knots, it was incredibly useful to have James Cherkoff of CIM to talk through the ten latest trends in website and user experience.

Highlighted important issues include the changing nature of search (Google Now predicts what you like, what you have searched for to give you the right information at the right time), changing environments including both inside the home and with outdoor developments (think smart homes and automated heating) and the way media devices are now vastly different and more advanced (in TV, rather than buying the media spot as a whole, you can just buy the audience!).

All these changes are constantly affecting our path-to-purchase and how we are stimulated as consumers, and how our “First Moment of Truth” is being replaced by “Zero Moment of Truth”. I won’t attempt to explain FMOT and ZMOT, but you can read more about it here, courtesy of Jenny Liu, Industry Marketing Manager, CPG.

Killer Tip: Whilst all these changes are happening, humans are still looking for the same values in products/services; value for money, reliability/longevity, services they can trust.

All in all, MWL 2014 was another great visit with great insight from world leaders in marketing and I for one am thoroughly excited to be a marketer in these times.

On that note, I leave you with an inspirational picture of promo item I picked up during our rounds. Thanks to Questback, who have given us new office mascot Malcolm the Moose.

Malcolm the Moose!

Malcolm the Moose!

See you next year for MWL 2015!

Ricco

 

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Jask Host Seminar to Budding Design Pupils

Teaching with Charlotte Harrodine, Kate Maddock and pupils of Dickens Heath Primary School

Teaching with Charlotte Harrodine, Kate Maddock and pupils of Dickens Heath Primary School

Ever wondered what we do when we’re not busy creating?

Hint: we most certainly do not watch England and their abysmal excuse for a football team, that’s for sure.

Cheap jibes against England aside, what we do do is try and give back to the community, and last week we were playing teacher to some budding design pupils from Dickens Heath Primary School, helping share our experiences in creative marketing and design.

Working with the Greater Birmingham & Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership, we were put in touch with local Solihull primary and secondary schools, including Dickens Heath, and were invited to partake in their Synergy Programme.

The main aim of the programme is to help guide students early on in their lives on routes into employment and showing what jobs are available at the end of their studies.

Magazine Production: Hints and Tips

Magazine Production: Hints and Tips

 

Stuart having fun being teacher for the day

Stuart having fun being teacher for the day

Playing host to a group of year 6 pupils who were designing an internal school magazine, myself, Managing Director Stuart Jordan and Creative Director Matt Ansell delivered a seminar on magazine production from start to finish to help guide them on how to progress. Topics included software options, page planning, design considerations and picture quality planning.

Our Creative Director Matt giving useful advice on how to design magazines

Our Creative Director Matt giving useful advice on how to design magazines

With young, impressionable and inquisitive minds, fair to say we were a little nervous! Thankfully it didn’t play out like an episode of Prime Minister’s Questions and the lovely students were kind to us with the Q&A after the seminar.

Thanks to Dickens Heath Primary School and teachers Charlotte Harrodine, Kate Maddock and Jacqueline Nicholls for giving us the opportunity to share our experience and thanks to Leeanne Parker Greater Birmingham and Solihull LEP for putting us in touch!

If you’d like to learn more about marketing and design, just give me a shout.

Ciao!

Ricco

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We’re looking for a new Web Developer…

We are looking for a talented Web Developer to join our expanding team. Working alongside our Creative Director and an existing web developer you will be involved in the full web development life cycle – from proposal to wireframe to build and deployment.

Take a look at our website to see the calibre of clients that you will work with – we get involved in a lot of projects, including some national names you will recognise. This is a chance to join an ever expanding team – and your opportunity to make a difference to a growing company.

Our modern, open plan offices are based 2 minutes from Solihull centre and there is a train station nearby (Olton) if you don’t fancy driving. If you do, we have free onsite car parking.

At Jask we work mainly with WordPress, so experience working with this CMS and PHP in general is a must- a good working knowledge of MySQL would also help. We also have some older projects running in Joomla so a basic understanding of this CMS would be useful.

Main duties include:


  • Assisting with proposals for new work
  • 
Sketching / wireframe development
  • Development of web projects
  • Working with creatives and account managers
  • Managing use of freelancers when required

Skills & Requirements
Skills and experience required:

  • Over 2 years experience in a similar environment
  • Advanced front end development (HTML, CSS & JavaScript / jQuery)
  • Experience building sites with PHP (ideally 2 years +)
  • Experience setting up and maintaining WordPress sites (essential)
  • Working knowledge of Magento (not essential)
  • Experience building responsive websites and testing those sites on physical and virtual devices
  • Working knowledge of Git for version control and collaboration
  • Ability to debug and code around the various quirks in different browsers
  • Good working knowledge of MySQL databases
  • Good understanding of user experience design
  • Knowledge of the latest web trends and open source projects
  • Basic Photoshop
  • An understanding of SEO best practices
  • We would expect applicants to be able to demonstrate some of these skills at the interview with some past projects.

What you’ll get:

  • A great salary
  • Company pension scheme
  • 25 days holiday
  • Training
  • Company/performance based bonus
  • The chance to make a difference in an agile company

We would expect applicants to be able to demonstrate some of these skills at the interview with some past projects.

NO AGENTS PLEASE!!

Click here and send a copy of your CV and a portfolio

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How to Create a Great Advert – 4 Key Principles

4keyprinciples

In today’s world, attention spans are short. So short in fact that we’ve dropped our attention span from 12 minutes to five minutes, according to an article by Neil Vidyarthi on Social Times. And that article was written 3 years ago, your attention span has probably dropped even further since!

Heck, you’ve probably stopped reading already, haven’t you? HAVEN’T YOU?!

Obviously, the big culprit is social media and the rapidly evolving technological world that is making us ever more “connected”.

So, to stand out from the crowd takes a colossal amount of creativity and marketing, especially when it’s print marketing. Thankfully, creative marketing is  in abundance here at Jask and we’ll now discuss a few key principles of creating an advert that stands out and grabs attention.

1. Message

Whether you’re educating the audience on your products, showcasing a range of services, raising awareness of new products or offering discounts or sales, every advert needs to have a clearly defined message.

Once you have your message, stick to it. Don’t overload your advert with too many points as that will convolute your message and give the audience too much information to take in.

2. Focus

Focus is a crucial element to whether your advert succeeds or fails. Once you have your message, you need to draw attention to your advertisement and make it memorable. Usually this means thought provoking imagery, but you can also use copy to good effect. A great example is Air Asia’s play on words below.

Air Asia - Phuket

3. Media Placement

Once you have your advert’s content, it is important to understand that it needs to be placed in the correct media for maximum effect. There is little to no point in advertising business to business products in a shopping centre poster site as that is not where your trade is looking for your services, for example.

Some advice? If you’re advertising in a publication, always look to place your advertisement on the right hand page as that is where your eyes are naturally drawn to first.

Some further advice? Use some common sense, unlike those who placed the following Turkish Airlines advert.

Turkish Airlines

4. Call to Action

Every advert needs a call to action (CTA), a clear instruction that gets people to interact after seeing the advert.  Whether it is a ‘click here for further information’, snap this QR code for a discount (love/hate on QR’s – that’s another story), visit this site for tickets etc., every advert needs it so your audience know what the next step is.

From a graphic design point of view then, your CTA is very important in terms of it’s placement, size, colour, contrast and appearance. It needs to be placed in a logical way that stands out and gets your audience to interact with it.

Hubspot’s Magdalena Georgieva (@mgieva) has compiled a list of effective CTAs that not only show them in action but also how and why they work. Have a read!

Of course, the rulebook to creating a good advert isn’t limited to what we’ve said here, and in fact is forever evolving with the changing ways we behave and are influenced. We like to think that these are the four cornerstones to a good advert and ones that should be followed to give you the best results.

Looking to design an advert or need more information? Just give us a shout.

Until next time!

Ricco

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Open to Opportunities, or Closed off from Chaos?

Work. The average adult will work around 40 hours a week. That equates to, in simple maths, 2,080 hours worked a year, and just under 25% of our time being given up to be in the workplace per week.

When you take out the time spent on sleep and travel, we all know that feeling: we actually spend more time at work than we do at home.

Looking at it this way, we should do as much as we can to make work feel less like work and instead a place of comfortable surrounding that promotes well-being, creativity and innovation. After all, nobody wants to feel like they are at work just to make ends meet. That’s where dreams go to die.

Enter the debate: Open Plan Offices vs. Closed Plan Offices.

At Jask we can say we have experienced both. You may have noticed we moved offices last year, (if you didn’t, where were you for this monumental occasion?) and during that move we also made the switch from closed plan to open plan offices, uniting the office and studio in the process.

For us, as creative marketing folk, the benefits were clear:

  1. Less walking from office to office relaying information across
  2. Better communication between account handlers and designers
  3. Creativity bounces around quicker and innovation can come from anybody as conversations are overheard and allows people to join in
  4. Making everybody feel part of one team and promoting dialogue between staff who wouldn’t normally talk to each other unless at lunch

However, where there is yin, there is also yang and some unforeseen drawbacks have come back round to bite us. The biggest of all?

Too much dialogue.

See, when you have an open floor, it can get pretty darn noisy. Acoustics-wise, with no walls or doors, the cavernous office can create a cacophony of noise that is impossible to escape from. Fridays, as you can imagine, are particularly chaotic.

And when it gets noisy, it gets hard to concentrate. And when it gets hard to concentrate, it gets frustrating. And when it gets frustrating…you can see where this is going.

Not only that, but we open ourselves up to being disturbed and so having that alone time to focus on getting jobs done is hard to come by. This is particularly troublesome for the graphic designers/web developers who are being asked to jump from job to job making various client amends.

So where do we go from here, you ask? Well, we aren’t going full circle back to being all closed off again as there will always be that need for collaboration between office and studio, but dividers will be put up between the two so it makes it less tempting to shout at each other from one side to the other.

Perhaps we might even consider hotel style ‘Do Not Disturb’ signs to hang off the backs of our chairs, who knows.

Of course, it’s not just us that face these problems. Facebook recently underwent the same considerations as they look to have ‘the largest open floor plan in the world’ as Zuckerberg expands into a new campus. Kevin Kruse, Forbes contributor, expresses similar concerns and wonders if it’ll work for better or worse.

I myself am a personal fan of Google’s London offices for its fun and creative spaces, which while looking open enough, also seem to have closed personal spaces. Judging from the way Google are progressing it seems innovation is easy to come by at their offices.

Give us a shout if you have your own thoughts on what works best!

Ricco

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Web Developer Needed!

We are looking for a talented Web Developer to join our team. Reporting to our Creative Director, you would be working with an existing web developer to build websites that have been designed by our creative team.

At Jask we work mainly with WordPress, so experience working with this CMS and PHP in general is a must- a good working knowledge of MySQL would also help. We also have some older projects running in Joomla so a basic understanding of this CMS would be useful.

Main duties include:
• Assisting with proposals for new work
• Sketching / wireframe development
• Development of web projects
• Working with creatives and account managers
• Managing use of freelancers when required

Skills and experience required:
• Over 2 years experience in a similar environment
• Advanced front end development (HTML, CSS & JavaScript / jQuery)
• Experience building sites with PHP (ideally 2 years +)
• Experience setting up and maintaining WordPress sites (essential)
• Working knowledge of Magento
• Experience building responsive websites and testing those sites on physical and virtual devices
• Working knowledge of Git for version control and collaboration
• Ability to debug and code around the various quirks in different browsers
• Good working knowledge of MySQL databases
• Good understanding of user experience design
• Knowledge of the latest web trends and open source projects
• Basic Photoshop
• An understanding of SEO best practices

We would expect applicants to be able to demonstrate some of these skills at the interview with some past projects.

Click here to email a copy of your CV to apply!

(No agencies please!!)

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How to make your business better at SEO

If your business has a website, you’ve probably heard about Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) in some form or another. It can be a complex process to understand, part technical and part marketing strategy – but why should you be doing it? And how can you do it better?

What is SEO? Why should you do it?

Search Engine Optimisation is the process of helping search engines better understand your website’s content and signaling to them that your website is the most relevant and authoritative one in your industry.

By getting the technical basics right and having a pro-active, ongoing content marketing strategy in place – your site will rank for search queries specific to your business, therefore increasing the amount or quality of traffic, quotes or sales you generate online.

How do Search Engines work?

Search Engines rely on complex algorithms and search robots that navigate through your website and rank your website based on its relative ‘authority’ for a given keyword.

Firstly, Google will crawl through your entire website to identify the most common search terms people would type in to find your businesses website – for example, flower shop in Surrey, computer repair in Oxford. This relates to a tactic called On-Page SEO.

Secondly, Google looks at the amount, quality and context of the links pointing to your website – to figure out if you’re the most relevant or ‘best’ website to rank for that query. Links, in the eyes of Google, almost act as a vote – the more votes (‘authority’) you have, the more likely you are to rank higher up the search results.

Google’s algorithm uses over 200 signals to determine a site’s authority, but on-page SEO and good quality links gained from a well thought out content marketing strategy are arguably the biggest influencers that decide the search terms your business will rank for and your overall visibility.

K2165-Jask-SEO-Graphic

 

Want some help increasing your site traffic and on-line enquiries?

Click here to contact Jask now for a full SEO audit showing how we can help improve your rankings and generate more sales from your website.

Embed 5 Ways to do SEO Better on Your Site: Copy and Paste the Code Below

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Brand Recognition – How to shape your Graphic Identity

Brand Recognition - What do you notice apart from the logo?

Brand Recognition – What do you notice apart from the logo?

So any budding marketeers, design agencies and creatives worth their salt will know that branding matters. In fact, I would like to think anybody and everybody knows branding matters, even if they don’t fully realise it.

Branding, quite simply put, is the identity that distinguishes one product from the next, e.g. Coca-Cola to Pepsi. What goes into your brand is determined by a number of aspects; culture, company values, your value proposition, messaging etc. I could go on but I’d be boring you then.

Basically, your brand encompasses everything you do. You live and die by it.

From our creative marketing standpoint, you would do well then to regard branding as one of the most important parts to your marketing arsenal. It is a lot more than ‘just a logo’, as we have heard many a person describe it before (you wouldn’t believe how irritated we get when we hear that).

By all means your logo acts as the most tangible touch point to your consumers. It is what they see and come into contact with first. It is what builds trust, elicits confidence and resonates your brand values to your consumers. Your logo is a visual representation of what you are about.

BUT!!! Don’t be mistaken. Your logo is not the be all and end all to your branding.

Think Cadbury. What are one of the first things you call to mind? I’ll bet my bottom dollar that somewhere in those first thoughts was the iconic Cadbury purple. (Disclaimer: I have no dollars, hence I can make this bet safe in the knowledge I won’t be losing anything).

Cadbury is a great example of how they have taken purple and made it truly their own. Likewise Coca-Cola have so many parts that make up their brand, including their own distinctive red colour, the shape of their bottles and the iconic Christmas trucks.

In fact, Coca-Cola’s so recognisable to us now that they were able to do away with their logo completely for the extremely effective Share a Coke campaign in Summer 2013.

It’s these important factors that make up your brand. Why else do you think Cadbury and Nestlé have waged legal wars costing God knows how much over a simple shade of purple?

These facets are the building blocks to having an individual Graphic Identity.

Susan Gunelius hits the nail on the head in part 2 of her blog post on Developing Brand Identity Guidelines. Your brand is made up of numerous aspects, including colour palette, typography, positioning, size and more. It is multifaceted in its nature, and it is these parts that make up your brand as a whole.

Possessing a distinctive graphic identity is even more important in today’s day and age with the multitude of mediums we can use to get messages across, including digital, apps, TV, print media, large format print media, promo items etc. These are what we call touchpoints, i.e. the place a customer might experience the brand.

Building trust, recognition and resonating your brand values from a graphical standpoint now stretches beyond simply dashing your logo across touchpoints and through adding consistent individual elements your brand recognition increases over time.

Being more than just a logo is what will add to your graphic identity, makes your brand recognisable from afar and serves to increase the awareness of your brand and its values.

Need help with your own branding? Give us a shout!

Ricco

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